You are currently browsing the monthly archive for August 2014.

RStudio is planning a new Master R Developer Workshop to be taught by Hadley Wickham in the San Francisco Bay Area on January 19-20. This will be the same workshop that Hadley is teaching in September in New York City to a sold out audience.

If you did not get a chance to register for the NYC workshop but wished to, consider attending the January Bay Area workshop. We will open registration once we have planned out all of the event details. If you would like to be notified when registration opens, leave a contact address here.

The Joint Statistical Meetings (JSM) start this weekend! We wanted to let you know we’ll be there. Be sure to check out these sessions from RStudio and friends:

Sunday, August 3

  • 4:00 PM: A Web Application for Efficient Analysis of Peptide Libraries: Eric Hare*+ and Timo Sieber and Heike Hofmann
  • 4:00 PM: Gravicom: A Web-Based Tool for Community Detection in Networks: Andrea Kaplan*+ and Heike Hofmann and Daniel Nordman

Monday, August 4

  • 8:35 AM: Preparing Students for Big Data Using R and Rstudio: Randall Pruim
  • 8:55 AM: Thinking with Data in the Second Course: Nicholas J. Horton and Ben S. Baumer and Hadley Wickham
  • 8:55 AM: Doing Reproducible Research Unconsciously: Higher Standard, but Less Work: Yihui Xie
  • 10:30 AM: Interactive Web Application with Shiny: Bharat Bahadur
  • 2:00 PM: Interactive Web Application with Shiny: Bharat Bahadur

Tuesday, August 5

  • 2:00PM: Give Me an Old Computer, a Blank DVD, and an Internet Connection and I’ll Give You World-Class Analytics: Ty Henkaline

Wednesday, August 6

  • 10:35 Shiny: Easy Web Applications in R:Joseph Cheng
  • 11:00 AM: ggvis: Moving Toward a Grammar of Interactive Graphics: Hadley Wickham

For even more talks on R we thought Joseph Rickert’s “Data Scientists and R Users Guide to the JSM” was excellent. Click here to see it. http://blog.revolutionanalytics.com/2014/07/a-data-scientists-and-r-users-guide-to-the-jsm.html

While you’re at the conference, please come by our exhibition area (Booth #112) to say hello. J.J., Hadley and other members of the team will be there. We’ve got enough space to talk about your plans for R and how RStudio Server Pro and Shiny Server Pro can provide enterprise-ready support and scalability for your RStudio IDE and Shiny Server deployments.

We hope to see you there!

R Markdown is a framework for writing versatile, reproducible reports from R. With R Markdown, you write a simple plain text report and then render it to create polished output. You can:

  1. Transform your file into a pdf, html, or Microsoft Word document—even a slideshow—at the click of a button.
  2. Embed R code into your report. When you render the file, R will run the code and insert its results into your report. Use this feature to add graphs and tables to your report: if your data ever changes, you can update your figures by re-rendering the report.
  3. Make interactive documents and slideshows. Your report becomes interactive when you embed Shiny code.

We’ve created a cheat sheet to help you master R Markdown. Download your copy here. You can also learn more about R Markdown at rmarkdown.rstudio.com and Introduction to R Markdown.

RM-cheatsheet

Shiny v0.10.1 has been released to CRAN. You can either install it from a CRAN mirror, or update it if you have installed a previous version.

install.packages('shiny', repos = 'http://cran.rstudio.com')
# or update your installed packages
# update.packages(ask = FALSE, repos = 'http://cran.rstudio.com')

The most prominent change in this patch release is that we added full Unicode support on Windows. Shiny apps running on Windows must use the UTF-8 encoding for ui.R and server.R (also the optional global.R, README.md, and DESCRIPTION) if they contain non-ASCII characters. See this article for details and examples: http://shiny.rstudio.com/articles/unicode.html

Chinese characters in a shiny app

Chinese characters in a shiny app

Please note although we require UTF-8 for the app components, UTF-8 is not a general requirement for any other files. If you read/write text files in an app, you are free to use any encoding you want, e.g. you can readLines('foo.txt', encoding = 'Windows-1252'). The article above has explained it in detail.

Other changes include:

  • runGitHub() also allows the 'username/repo' syntax now, which is equivalent to runGitHub('repo', 'username'). (#427)
  • navbarPage() now accepts a windowTitle parameter to set the web browser page title to something other than the title displayed in the navbar.
  • Added an inline argument to textOutput(), imageOutput(), plotOutput(), and htmlOutput(). When inline = TRUE, these outputs will be put in span() instead of the default div(). This occurs automatically when these outputs are created via the inline expressions (e.g. `r renderText(expr)`) in R Markdown documents. See an R Markdown example at http://shiny.rstudio.com/gallery/inline-output.html (#512)
  • Added support for option groups in the select/selectize inputs. When the choices argument for selectInput()/selectizeInput() is a list of sub-lists and any sub-list is of length greater than 1, the HTML tag <optgroup> will be used. See an example at here (#542)

Please let us know if you have any comments or questions.

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