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Shiny version 0.4.0 is now available on CRAN. The most visible change is that the API has been slightly simplified. Your existing code will continue to work, although Shiny will print messages about how to migrate your code. Migration should be straightforward, as described below. It will take a bit of work to switch to the new API, but we think it’s worth it in the long run, because the new interface is somewhat simpler, and because it offers a better mapping between function names and reactive programming concepts.

We’ve also updated the Shiny tutorial to reflect the changes, and we’ve also added a some new content explaining Shiny’s reactive programming model in depth. If you want to have a better understanding of how Shiny works, see the sections under Understanding Reactivity, starting with the Reactivity Overview.

Another new feature is that Shiny now suspends outputs when they aren’t visible on the user’s web browser. For example, if your Shiny application has multiple tabs or conditional panels, Shiny will only run the calculations and send data for the currently-visible tabs and panels. This new feature will reduce network traffic and computational load on the server, resulting in a faster application.

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Version 0.3.0 of Shiny is now available on CRAN. This version of Shiny has several new features and bug fixes. Some of the changes are under the hood: for example, Shiny now uses a more efficient algorithm for scheduling the execution of reactive functions. There are also some user-facing changes: for example, the new runGitHub() function lets you download and run applications directly from a GitHub repository.

We’ve updated the tutorial page with documentation about these and other features. For a full list of changes, see the the NEWS file.

You can install the new version of Shiny with install.packages('shiny').

We’re pleased to announce new versions of ggplot2 (0.9.3) and plyr (1.8).  To get up and running with the new versions, start a clean R session without ggplot2 or plyr loaded, and run install.packages(c("ggplot2", "gtable", "scales", "plyr")). Read on to find out what’s new.

ggplot2 0.9.3

Most of the changes version 0.9.3 are bug fixes. Perhaps the most visible change is that ggplot will now print out warning messages when you use stat="bin" and also map a variable to y. For example, these are valid:

ggplot(mtcars, aes(wt, mpg)) + geom_bar(stat = "identity")
ggplot(mtcars, aes(cyl)) + geom_bar(stat = "bin")

But this will result in some warnings:

ggplot(mtcars, aes(wt, mpg)) + geom_bar(stat = "bin")
# The default stat for geom_bar is "bin", so this is the same as above:
ggplot(mtcars, aes(wt, mpg)) + geom_bar()

The reason for this change is to make behavior more consistent – stat_bin generates a y value, and so should not work when you also map a value to y.

For a full list of changes, please see the NEWS file.

plyr 1.8

Version 1.8 has 28 improvements and bug fixes. Among the most prominent:

  • All parallel plyr functions gain a .paropts argument, a list of options that is passed onto foreach which allows you to control parallel execution.
  • progress_time is a new progress bar contributed by Mike Lawrence estimates the amount of time remaining before a job is complete
  • The summarise() function now calculates columns sequentially, so you can calculate new columns from other new columns, like this:
       summarise(mtcars, x = disp/10, y = x/10)
    

    This behavior is similar to the mutate() function. Please be aware that this could change the behavior of existing code, if any columns of the output have the same name but different values as columns in the input. For example, this will result in different behavior in plyr 1.7 and 1.8:

       summarise(mtcars, disp = disp/10, y = disp*10)
    

    In the old version, the y column would equal mtcars$disp * 10, and in the new version, it would equal mtcars$disp.

  • There are a number of performance improvements: a*ply uses more efficient indexing so should be more competitive with apply; d*ply, quickdf_df and idata.frame all have performance tweaks which will help a few people out a lot, and a lot of people a little.

For a full list of changes, please see the NEWS file.

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