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RStudio is excited to announce the general availability (GA) of shinyapps.io.

Shinyapps.io is an easy to use, secure, and scalable hosted service already being used by thousands of professionals and students to deploy Shiny applications on the web. Effective today, shinyapps.io has completed beta testing and is generally available as a commercial service for anyone.

As regular readers of our blog know, Shiny is a popular free and open source R package from RStudio that simplifies the creation of interactive web applications, dashboards, and reports. Until today, Shiny Server and Shiny Server Pro were the most popular ways to share shiny apps. Now, there is a commercially supported alternative for individuals and groups who don’t have the time or resources to install and manage their own servers.

We want to thank the nearly 8,000 people who created at least one shiny app and deployed it on shinyapps.io during its extensive alpha and beta testing phases! The service was improved for everyone because of your willingness to give us feedback and bear with us as we continuously added to its capabilities.

For R users developing shiny applications that haven’t yet created a shinyapps.io account, we hope you’ll give it a try soon!  We did our best to keep the pricing simple and predictable with Free, Basic, Standard, and Professional plans. Each paid plan has features and functionality that we think will appeal to different users and can be purchased with a credit card by month or year. You can learn more about shinyapps.io pricing plans and product features on our website.

We hope to see your shiny app on shinyapps.io soon!

RStudio’s data viewer provides a quick way to look at the contents of data frames and other column-based data in your R environment. You invoke it by clicking on the grid icon in the Environment pane, or at the console by typing View(mydata).

grid icon

As part of the RStudio Preview Release, we’ve completely overhauled RStudio’s data viewer with modern features provided in part by a new interface built on DataTables.

No Row Limit

While the data viewer in 0.98 was limited to the first 1,000 rows, you can now view all the rows of your data set. RStudio loads just the portion of the data you’re looking at into the user interface, so things won’t get sluggish even when you’re working with large data sets.

no row limit

We’ve also added fixed column headers, and support for column labels imported from SPSS and other systems.

Sorting and Filtering

RStudio isn’t designed to act like a spreadsheet, but sometimes it’s helpful to do a quick sort or filter to get some idea of the data’s characteristics before moving into reproducible data analysis. Towards that end, we’ve built some basic sorting and filtering into the new data viewer.

Sorting

Click a column once to sort data in ascending order, and again to sort in descending order. For instance, how big is the biggest diamond?

sorting

To clear all sorts and filters on the data, click the upper-left column header.

Filtering

Click the new Filter button to enter Filter mode, then click the white filter value box to filter a column. You might, for instance, want to look at only at smaller diamonds:

filter

Not all data types can be filtered; at the moment, you can filter only numeric types, characters, and factors.

You can also stack filters; for instance, let’s further restrict this view to small diamonds with a Very Good cut:

filter factor

Full-Text Search

You can search the full text of your data frame using the new Search box in the upper right. This is useful for finding specific records; for instance, how many people named John were born in 2013?

full-text search

Live Update

If you invoke the data viewer on a variable as in View(mydata), the data viewer will (in most cases) automatically refresh whenever data in the variable changes.

You can use this feature to watch data change as you manipulate it. It continues to work even when the data viewer is popped out, a configuration that combines well with multi-monitor setups.

We hope these improvements help make you understand your data more quickly and easily. Try out the RStudio Preview Release and let us know what you think!

RStudio’s code editor includes a set of lightweight Vim key bindings. You can turn these on in Tools | Global Options | Code | Editing:

global options

For those not familiar, Vim is a popular text editor built to enable efficient text editing. It can take some practice and dedication to master Vim style editing but those who have done so typically swear by it. RStudio’s “vim mode” enables the use of many of the most common keyboard operations from Vim right inside RStudio.

As part of the 0.99 preview release, we’ve included an upgraded version of the ACE editor, which has a completely revamped Vim mode. This mode extends the range of Vim key bindings that are supported, and implements a number of Vim “power features” that go beyond basic text motions and editing. These include:

  • Vertical block selection via Ctrl + V. This integrates with the new multiple cursor support in ACE and allows you to type in multiple lines at once.
  • Macro playback and recording, using q{register} / @{register}.
  • Marks, which allow you drop markers in your source and jump back to them quickly later.
  • A selection of Ex commands, such as :wq and :%s that allow you to perform editor operations as you would in native Vim.
  • Fast in-file search with e.g. / and *, and support for JavaScript regular expressions.

We’ve also added a Vim quick reference card to the IDE that you can bring up at any time to show the supported key bindings. To see it, switch your editor to Vim mode (as described above) and type :help in Command mode.

vim quick reference card

Whether you’re a Vim novice or power user, we hope these improvements make the RStudio IDE’s editor a more productive and enjoyable environment for you. You can try the new Vim features out now by downloading the RStudio Preview Release.

We’re busy at work on the next version of RStudio (v0.99) and this week will be blogging about some of the noteworthy new features. If you want to try out any of the new features now you can do so by downloading the RStudio Preview Release.

The first feature to highlight is a fully revamped implementation of code completion for R. We’ve always supported a limited form of completion however (a) it only worked on objects in the global environment; and (b) it only worked when expressly requested via the tab key. As a result not nearly enough users discovered or benefitted from code completion. In this release code completion is much more comprehensive.

Smarter Completion Engine

Previously RStudio only completed variables that already existed in the global environment, now completion is done based on source code analysis so is provided even for objects that haven’t been fully evaluated:

document-inferred

Completions are also provided for a wide variety of specialized contexts including dimension names in [ and [[:

bracket

RStudio now provides completions for function arguments within function chains using magrittr’s %>% operator, for e.g. dplyr data transformation pipelines. Extending this behavior, we also provide the appropriate completions for the various ‘verbs’ used by dplyr:

dplyr        dplyr_verb

In addition, certain functions, such as library() and require(), expect package names for completions. RStudio automatically infers whether a particular function expects a package name and provides those names as completion results:

library

Completion is now also S3 and S4 aware. If RStudio is able to determine which method a particular function call will be dispatched to it will attempt to retrieve completions from that method. For example, the sort.default() method provides an extra argument, na.last, not available in the sort() generic. RStudio will provide completions for that argument if S3 dispatch would choose sort.default()

s3

Beyond what’s described above there are lots more new places where completions are provided:

  • For Shiny applications, completions for ui.R + server.R pairs
  • Completions for knitr options, e.g. in opts_chunk$get(), are now supplied
  • Completions for dynamic symbols within .C, .Call, .Fortran, .External

Additional Enhancements

Always On Completion

Previously RStudio only displayed completions “on-demand” in response to the tab key. Now, RStudio will proactively display completions after a $ or :: as well as after a period of typing inactivity. All of this behavior is configurable via the new completion options panel:

options

File Completions

When within an RStudio project, completions will be applied recursively to all file names matching the current token. The enclosing parent directory is printed on the right:

file

Fuzzy Narrowing

Got a completion with an excessively long name, perhaps a particularly long named Bioconductor package, or another variable or function name of long length? RStudio now uses ‘fuzzy narrowing’ on the completion list, by checking to see if the completion matches a ‘subsequence’ within each completion. By subsequence, we mean a sequence of characters not necessarily connected within the completion, so that for example, ‘fpse’ could match ‘file_path_sans_extension’. We hope that users will quickly become accustomed to this behavior and find it very useful.

fuzzy

Trying it Out

We think that the new completion features make for a qualitatively better experience of writing R code for beginning and expert users alike.  You can give the new features a try now by downloading the RStudio Preview Release.  If you run into problems or have feedback on how we could make things better let us know on our Support Forum.

 

I’m very pleased to announce that Epoch.com has stepped up as a sponsor for the RMySQL package.

For the last 20 years, Epoch.com has built its Internet Payment Service Provider infrastructure on open source software. Their data team, led by Szilard Pafka, PhD, has been using R for nearly a decade, developing cutting-edge data visualization, machine learning and other analytical applications. According to Epoch, “We have always believed in the value of R and in the importance of contributing to the open source community.”

This sort of sponsorship is very important to me. While I already spend most of my time working on R packages, I don’t have the skills to fix every problem. Sponsorship allows me to hire outside experts. In this case, Epoch.com’s sponsorship allowed me to work with Jeroen Ooms to improve the build system for RMySQL so that a CRAN binary is available for every platform.

Is your company interested in sponsoring other infrastructure work that benefits the whole R community? If so, please get in touch.