You are currently browsing the monthly archive for February 2017.

Couldn’t make it to Orlando in January?  We’re excited to bring you the next best thing.

Whether you missed the conference, missed a talk, or just want to refresh your memory, you can find all the recordings from the first ever conference about All Things R & RStudio at https://www.rstudio.com/resources/webinars/#rstudioconf. Just click on +rstudio::conf 2017 when you get there to expand the list.

Of course, the session recordings can’t capture the complete “in person” experience. You had to be there to immerse in the 2 day workshops led by Hadley Wickham, Garrett Grolemund, and Joe Cheng; join in cocktails and conversation at the Datacamp Happy Hour; attend the exclusive Friday evening access to Universal Studio’s Wizarding World of Harry Potter under a full moon; hang out at the RStudio Connect lounge and with our friends from Cloudera, Mango Solutions, MetrumRG, Quantide, and Supstat; or make and renew friendships with more than 400 attendees from every line of work and the entire RStudio team. We hope you’ll consider joining us in January 2018 – location and exact dates still to be announced.

In the meantime, the recordings showcase some of the most interesting uses of R and RStudio for everyone.

Enjoy and share!

If big data is your thing, you use R, and you’re headed to Strata + Hadoop World in San Jose March 13 & 14th, you can experience in person how easy and practical it is to analyze big data with R and Spark.

In a beginner level talk by RStudio’s Edgar Ruiz and an intermediate level  workshop by Win-Vector’s John Mount, we cover the spectrum: What R is, what Spark is, how Sparklyr works, and what is required to set up and tune a Spark cluster. You’ll also learn practical applications including: how to quickly set up a local Spark instance, store big data in Spark and then connect to the data with R, use R to apply machine-learning algorithms to big data stored in Spark, and filter and aggregate big data stored in Spark and then import the results into R for analysis and visualization.

2:40pm–3:20pm Wednesday, March 15, 2017
Sparklyr: An R interface for Apache Spark
Edgar Ruiz (RStudio)
Primary topic: Spark & beyond
Location: LL21 C/D
Level: Beginner
Secondary topics: R

1:30pm–5:00pm Tuesday, March 14, 2017
Modeling big data with R, sparklyr, and Apache Spark
John Mount (Win-Vector LLC)
Primary topic: Data science & advanced analytics
Location: LL21 C/D
Level: Intermediate
Secondary topics: R

While you’re  at the conference be sure to look us up in the Innovator’s Pavilion – booth number P8 during the Expo Hall hours. We’ll have the latest books from RStudio authors, t-shirts to win, demonstrations of RStudio Connect and RStudio Server Pro and, of course, stickers and cheatsheets. Share with us what you’re doing with RStudio and get your product and company questions answered by RStudio employees.

See you in San Jose! (https://conferences.oreilly.com/strata/strata-ca)

We’re excited to announce the latest release of RStudio Connect: version 1.4.2. This release includes a number of notable features including an overhauled interface for parameterized R Markdown reports.

Enhanced Parameterized R Markdown Reports

Enhanced Parameterized R Markdown Reports

The most notable feature in this release is the ability to publish parameterized R Markdown reports that are easier for anyone to customize. If you’re unfamiliar, parameterized R Markdown reports allow you to inject input parameters into your R Markdown document to alter what analysis the report performs. The parameters of your R Markdown report are now visible on the left-hand sidebar, allowing users to easily tweak the inputs to the document and quickly view the output in the browser.

Users even have the opportunity to create private versions of the report which they can schedule to run again, email, or save and revisit in the browser. Of course, you can continue to use the wide variety of output formats (notebooks, dashboards, books, and others) while using parameterized R Markdown.

In addition to the parameterized report overhaul, there are some other notable features included in this release.

  • Content private by default – Content is set to private (“Just Me”) by default. Users can still change the visibility of their content before publishing, as before.
  • Execute R as the authenticated viewer – You can now choose to have some applications execute their underlying R process as the authenticated viewer currently looking at the app. This allows applications to access any data or resource that the associated user has access to on the server. Requires PAM authentication. More details here.

Other important features include:

  • Show progress indicator when updating a report.
  • Users can now filter content to include only items that they can edit or view.
  • Users now only count against the named user license limit after they log in for the first time.
  • Added support for global “System Messages” that can display an HTML message to your users on the landing pages. Details here.
  • Updated packrat to gain more transparency on package build errors.
  • Updated the list of SSL ciphers to correspond with modern best-practices.

If you haven’t yet had a chance to download and try RStudio Connect we encourage you to do so. RStudio Connect is the best way to share all the work that you do in R (Shiny apps, R Markdown documents, plots, dashboards, etc.) with collaborators, colleagues, or customers.

You can find more details or download a 45 day evaluation of the product at https://www.rstudio.com/products/connect/. Additional resources can be found below.

roxygen2 6.0.0 is now available on CRAN. roxygen2 helps you document your packages by turning specially formatted inline comments into R’s standard Rd format. It automates everything that can be automated, and provides helpers for sharing documentation between topics. Learn more at http://r-pkgs.had.co.nz/man.html. Install the latest version with:

install.packages("roxygen2")

There are two headline features in this version of roxygen2:

  • Markdown support.
  • Improved documentation inheritance.

These are described in detail below.

This release also included many minor improvements and bug fixes. For a full list of changes, please see release notes. A big thanks to all the contributors to this release: @dlebauer@fmichonneau@gaborcsardi@HenrikBengtsson@jefferis@jeroenooms@jimhester@kevinushey@krlmlr@LiNk-NY@lorenzwalthert@maxheld83@nteetor@shrektan@yutannihilation

Markdown

Thanks to the hard work of Gabor Csardi you can now write roxygen2 comments in markdown. While we have tried to make markdown mode as backward compatible as possible, there are a few cases where you will need to make some minor changes. For this reason, you’ll need to explicitly opt-in to markdown support. There are two ways to do so:

  • Add Roxygen: list(markdown = TRUE) to your DESCRIPTION to turn it on everywhere.
  • Add @md to individual roxygen blocks to enable for selected topics.

roxygen2’s markdown dialect supports inline formatting (bold, italics, code), lists (numbered and bulleted), and a number of helpful link shortcuts:

  • [func()]: links to a function in the current package, and is translated to \code{\link[=func]{func()}.
  • [object]: links to an object in the current package, and is translated to \link{object}.
  • [link text][object]: links to an object with custom text, and is translated to \link[=link text]{object}

Similarly, you can link to functions and objects in other packages with [pkg::func()][pkg::object], and [link text][pkg::object]. For a complete list of syntax, and how to handle common problems, please see vignette("markdown") for more details.

To convert an existing roxygen2 package to use markdown, try https://github.com/r-pkgs/roxygen2md. Happy markdown-ing!

Improved inheritance

Writing documentation is challenging because you want to reduce duplication as much as possible (so you don’t accidentally end up with inconsistent documentation) but you don’t want the user to have to follow a spider’s web of cross-references. This version of roxygen2 provides more support for writing documentation in one place then reusing in multiple topics.

The new @inherit tag allows to you inherit parameters, return, references, title, description, details, sections, and seealso from another topic. @inherit my_fun will inherit everything; @inherit my_fun return params will allow to you inherit specified components. @inherits fun sections will inherit all sections; if you’d like to inherit a single section, you can use @inheritSection fun title. You can also inherit from a topic in another package with @inherit pkg::fun.

Another new tag is @inheritDotParams, which allows you to automatically generate parameter documentation for ... for the common case where you pass ... on to another function. The documentation generated is similar to the style used in ?plot and will eventually be incorporated in to RStudio’s autocomplete. When you pass along ... you often override some arguments, so the tag has a flexible specification:

  • @inheritDotParams foo takes all parameters from foo().
  • @inheritDotParams foo a b e:h takes parameters ab, and all parameters between e and h.
  • @inheritDotParams foo -x -y takes all parameters except for x and y.

All the @inherit tags (including the existing @inheritParams) now work recursively, so you can inherit from a function that inherited from elsewhere.

If you want to generate a basic package documentation page (accessible from package?packagename and ?packagename), you can document the special sentinel value "_PACKAGE". It automatically uses the title, description, authors, url and bug reports fields from the DESCRIPTION. The simplest approach is to do this:

#' @keywords internal
"_PACKAGE"

It only includes what’s already in the DESCRIPTION, but it will typically be easier for R users to access.