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rstudio::conf 2017, the conference on all things R and RStudio, is only 90 days away. Now is the time to claim your spot or grab one of the few remaining seats at Training Days – including the new Tidyverse workshop.


Whether you’re already registered or still working on it, we’re delighted today to announce the full conference schedule, so that you can plan your days in Florida.

rstudio::conf 2017 takes place January 12-14 at the Gaylord Resorts in Kissimmee, Florida. There are over 30 talks and tutorials to choose from that are sure to accelerate your productivity in R and RStudio. In addition to the highlights below, topics include the latest news on R notebooks, sparklyr, profiling, the tidyverse, shiny, r markdown, html widgets, data access and the new enterprise-scale publishing capabilities of RStudio Connect.

Schedule Highlights

– Hadley Wickham, Chief Scientist, RStudio: Data Science in the Tidyverse
– Andrew Flowers, Economics Writer, FiveThirtyEight: Finding and Telling Stories with R
– J.J. Allaire, Software Engineer, CEO & Founder: RStudio Past, Present and Future

– Winston Chang, Software Engineer, RStudio: Building Dashboards with Shiny
– Charlotte Wickham, Oregon State University: Happy R Users Purrr
– Yihui Xie, Software Engineer, RStudio: Advanced R Markdown
– Jenny Bryan, University of British Columbia: Happy Git and GitHub for the UseR

Featured Speakers
– Max Kuhn, Senior Director Non-Clinical Statistics, Pfizer
– Dirk Eddelbuettel, Ketchum Trading: Extending R with C++: A Brief Introduction to Rcpp
– Hilary Parker, Stitch Fix: Opinionated Analysis Development“
Bryan Lewis, Paradigm4: “Fun with htmlwidgets”
Ryan Hafen, Hafen Consulting: “Interactive plotting with rbokeh and crosstalk”
Julia Silge, Datassist: “Text mining, the tidy way”
Bob Rudis, Rapid7: “Writing readable code with pipes”

Featured Talk
– Joseph Rickert, R Ambassador, RStudio: R’s Role in Data Science

Be sure to visit for the full schedule and latest updates and don’t forget to download the RStudio conference app to help you plan your days in detail.

Special Reminder: When you register, make sure you purchase your ticket for Friday evening at Universal’s Wizarding World of Harry Potter. The park is reserved exclusively for rstudio::conf attendees. It’s an extraordinary experience we’re sure you’ll enjoy!

We appreciate our sponsors and exhibitors!

If there’s one word that could describe the default styling of Shiny applications, it might be “minimalist.” Shiny’s UI components are built using the Bootstrap web framework, and unless the appearance is customized, the application will be mostly white and light gray.

Fortunately, it’s easy to add a bit of flavor to your Shiny application, with the shinythemes package. We’ve just released version 1.1.1 of shinythemes, which includes many new themes from, as well as a theme selector which you can use to test out different themes on a live Shiny application.

Here’s an example of the theme selector in use (try out the app here):


To install the latest version of shinythemes, run:


To use the theme selector, all you need to do is add this somewhere in your app’s UI code:


Once you’ve chosen which theme you want, all you need to do is use the theme argument of the bootstrapPage, fluidPage, navbarPage, or fixedPage functions. If you want to use “cerulean”, you would do this:

fluidPage(theme = shinytheme("cerulean"),

To learn more and see screenshots of the different themes, visit the shinythemes web page. Enjoy!


haven 1.0.0 is a major release, and indicates that haven is now largely feature complete and has been tested on many real world datasets. There are four major changes in this version of haven:

  1. Improvements to the underlying ReadStat library
  2. Better handling of “special” missing values
  3. Improved date/time support
  4. Support for other file metadata.

There were also a whole bunch of other minor improvements and bug fixes: you can see the complete list in the release notes.


Haven builds on top of the ReadStat C library by Evan Miller. This version of haven includes many improvements thanks to Evan’s hard work on ReadStat:

  • Can read binary/Ross compressed SAS files.
  • Support for reading and writing Stata 14 data files.
  • New write_sas() allows you to write data frames out to sas7bdat files. This is still somewhat experimental.
  • read_por() now actually works.
  • Many other bug fixes and minor improvements.

Missing values

haven 1.0.0 includes comprehensive support for the “special” types of missing values found in SAS, SPSS, and Stata. All three tools provide a global “system missing value”, displayed as .. This is roughly equivalent to R’s NA, although neither Stata nor SAS propagate missingness in numeric comparisons (SAS treats the missing value as the smallest possible number and Stata treats it as the largest possible number).

Each tool also provides a mechanism for recording multiple types of missingness:

  • Stata has “extended” missing values, .A through .Z.
  • SAS has “special” missing values, .A through .Z plus ._.
  • SPSS has per-column “user” missing values. Each column can declare up to three distinct values or a range of values (plus one distinct value) that should be treated as missing.

Stata and SAS only support tagged missing values for numeric columns. SPSS supports up to three distinct values for character columns. Generally, operations involving a user-missing type return a system missing value.

Haven models these missing values in two different ways:

  • For SAS and Stata, haven provides tagged_na() which extend R’s regular NA to add a single character label.
  • For SPSS, haven provides labelled_spss() that also models user defined values and ranges.

Use zap_missing() if you just want to convert to R’s regular NAs.

You can get more details in the semantics vignette.


Support for date/times has substantially improved:

  • read_dta() now recognises “%d” and custom date types.
  • read_sav() now correctly recognises EDATE and JDATE formats as dates. Variables with format DATE, ADATE, EDATE, JDATE or SDATE are imported as Date variables instead of POSIXct.
  • write_dta() and write_sav() support writing date/times.
  • Support for hms() has been moved into the hms package. Time varibles now have class c("hms", "difftime") and a unitsattribute with value “secs”.

Other metadata

Haven is slowly adding support for other types of metadata:

  • Variable formats can be read and written. Similarly to to variable labels, formats are stored as an attribute on the vector. Use zap_formats() if you want to remove these attributes.
  • Added support for reading file “label” and “notes”. These are not currently printed, but are stored in the attributes if you need to access them.

We’re excited today to announce sparklyr, a new package that provides an interface between R and Apache Spark.

Over the past couple of years we’ve heard time and time again that people want a native dplyr interface to Spark, so we built one! sparklyr also provides interfaces to Spark’s distributed machine learning algorithms and much more. Highlights include:

  • Interactively manipulate Spark data using both dplyr and SQL (via DBI).
  • Filter and aggregate Spark datasets then bring them into R for analysis and visualization.
  • Orchestrate distributed machine learning from R using either Spark MLlib or H2O SparkingWater.
  • Create extensions that call the full Spark API and provide interfaces to Spark packages.
  • Integrated support for establishing Spark connections and browsing Spark data frames within the RStudio IDE.

We’re also excited to be working with several industry partners. IBM is incorporating sparklyr into their Data Science Experience, Cloudera is working with us to ensure that sparklyr meets the requirements of their enterprise customers, and H2O has provided an integration between sparklyr and H2O Sparkling Water.

Getting Started

You can install sparklyr from CRAN as follows:


You should also install a local version of Spark for development purposes:

spark_install(version = "1.6.2")

If you use the RStudio IDE, you should also download the latest preview release of the IDE which includes several enhancements for interacting with Spark.

Extensive documentation and examples are available at

Connecting to Spark

You can connect to both local instances of Spark as well as remote Spark clusters. Here we’ll connect to a local instance of Spark:

sc <- spark_connect(master = "local")

The returned Spark connection (sc) provides a remote dplyr data source to the Spark cluster.

Reading Data

You can copy R data frames into Spark using the dplyr copy_to function (more typically though you’ll read data within the Spark cluster using the spark_read family of functions). For the examples below we’ll copy some datasets from R into Spark (note that you may need to install the nycflights13 and Lahman packages in order to execute this code):

iris_tbl <- copy_to(sc, iris)
flights_tbl <- copy_to(sc, nycflights13::flights, "flights")
batting_tbl <- copy_to(sc, Lahman::Batting, "batting")

Using dplyr

We can now use all of the available dplyr verbs against the tables within the cluster. Here’s a simple filtering example:

# filter by departure delay
flights_tbl %>% filter(dep_delay == 2)

Introduction to dplyr provides additional dplyr examples you can try. For example, consider the last example from the tutorial which plots data on flight delays:

delay <- flights_tbl %>% 
  group_by(tailnum) %>%
  summarise(count = n(), dist = mean(distance), delay = mean(arr_delay)) %>%
  filter(count > 20, dist < 2000, ! %>%

# plot delays
ggplot(delay, aes(dist, delay)) +
  geom_point(aes(size = count), alpha = 1/2) +
  geom_smooth() +
  scale_size_area(max_size = 2)
Note that while the dplyr functions shown above look identical to the ones you use with R data frames, with sparklyr they use Spark as their back end and execute remotely in the cluster.

Window Functions

dplyr window functions are also supported, for example:

batting_tbl %>%
  select(playerID, yearID, teamID, G, AB:H) %>%
  arrange(playerID, yearID, teamID) %>%
  group_by(playerID) %>%
  filter(min_rank(desc(H)) <= 2 & H > 0)

For additional documentation on using dplyr with Spark see the dplyr section of the sparklyr website.

Using SQL

It’s also possible to execute SQL queries directly against tables within a Spark cluster. The spark_connection object implements a DBI interface for Spark, so you can use dbGetQuery to execute SQL and return the result as an R data frame:

iris_preview <- dbGetQuery(sc, "SELECT * FROM iris LIMIT 10")

Machine Learning

You can orchestrate machine learning algorithms in a Spark cluster via either Spark MLlib or via the H2O Sparkling Water extension package. Both provide a set of high-level APIs built on top of DataFrames that help you create and tune machine learning workflows.

Spark MLlib

In this example we’ll use ml_linear_regression to fit a linear regression model. We’ll use the built-in mtcars dataset, and see if we can predict a car’s fuel consumption (mpg) based on its weight (wt) and the number of cylinders the engine contains (cyl). We’ll assume in each case that the relationship between mpg and each of our features is linear.

# copy mtcars into spark
mtcars_tbl <- copy_to(sc, mtcars)

# transform our data set, and then partition into 'training', 'test'
partitions <- mtcars_tbl %>%
  filter(hp >= 100) %>%
  mutate(cyl8 = cyl == 8) %>%
  sdf_partition(training = 0.5, test = 0.5, seed = 1099)

# fit a linear model to the training dataset
fit <- partitions$training %>%
  ml_linear_regression(response = "mpg", features = c("wt", "cyl"))

For linear regression models produced by Spark, we can use summary() to learn a bit more about the quality of our fit, and the statistical significance of each of our predictors.


Spark machine learning supports a wide array of algorithms and feature transformations, and as illustrated above it’s easy to chain these functions together with dplyr pipelines. To learn more see the Spark MLlib section of the sparklyr website.

H2O Sparkling Water

Let’s walk the same mtcars example, but in this case use H2O’s machine learning algorithms via the H2O Sparkling Water extension. The dplyr code used to prepare the data is the same, but after partitioning into test and training data we call h2o.glm rather than ml_linear_regression:

# convert to h20_frame (uses the same underlying rdd)
training <- as_h2o_frame(partitions$training)
test <- as_h2o_frame(partitions$test)

# fit a linear model to the training dataset
fit <- h2o.glm(x = c("wt", "cyl"),
               y = "mpg",
               training_frame = training,
               lamda_search = TRUE)

# inspect the model

For linear regression models produced by H2O, we can use either print() or summary() to learn a bit more about the quality of our fit. The summary() method returns some extra information about scoring history and variable importance.

To learn more see the H2O Sparkling Water section of the sparklyr website.


The facilities used internally by sparklyr for its dplyr and machine learning interfaces are available to extension packages. Since Spark is a general purpose cluster computing system there are many potential applications for extensions (e.g. interfaces to custom machine learning pipelines, interfaces to 3rd party Spark packages, etc.).

The sas7bdat extension enables parallel reading of SAS datasets in the sas7bdat format into Spark data frames. The rsparkling extension provides a bridge between sparklyr and H2O’s Sparkling Water.

We’re excited to see what other sparklyr extensions the R community creates. To learn more see the Extensions section of the sparklyr website.

RStudio IDE

The latest RStudio Preview Release of the RStudio IDE includes integrated support for Spark and the sparklyr package, including tools for:

  • Creating and managing Spark connections
  • Browsing the tables and columns of Spark DataFrames
  • Previewing the first 1,000 rows of Spark DataFrames

Once you’ve installed the sparklyr package, you should find a new Spark pane within the IDE. This pane includes a New Connection dialog which can be used to make connections to local or remote Spark instances:

Once you’ve connected to Spark you’ll be able to browse the tables contained within the Spark cluster:

The Spark DataFrame preview uses the standard RStudio data viewer:

The RStudio IDE features for sparklyr are available now as part of the RStudio Preview Release. The final version of RStudio IDE that includes integrated support for sparklyr will ship within the next few weeks.


We’re very pleased to be joined in this announcement by IBM, Cloudera, and H2O, who are working with us to ensure that sparklyr meets the requirements of enterprise customers and is easy to integrate with current and future deployments of Spark.


“With our latest contributions to Apache Spark and the release of sparklyr, we continue to emphasize R as a primary data science language within the Spark community. Additionally, we are making plans to include sparklyr in Data Science Experience to provide the tools data scientists are comfortable with to help them bring business-changing insights to their companies faster,” said Ritika Gunnar, vice president of Offering Management, IBM Analytics.


“At Cloudera, data science is one of the most popular use cases we see for Apache Spark as a core part of the Apache Hadoop ecosystem, yet the lack of a compelling R experience has limited data scientists’ access to available data and compute,” said Charles Zedlewski, vice president, Products at Cloudera. “We are excited to partner with RStudio to help bring sparklyr to the enterprise, so that data scientists and IT teams alike can get more value from their existing skills and infrastructure, all with the security, governance, and management our customers expect.”


“At, we’ve been focused on bringing the best of breed open source machine learning to data scientists working in R & Python. However, the lack of robust tooling in the R ecosystem for interfacing with Apache Spark has made it difficult for the R community to take advantage of the distributed data processing capabilities of Apache Spark.

We’re excited to work with RStudio to bring the ease of use of dplyr and the distributed machine learning algorithms from H2O’s Sparkling Water to the R community via the sparklyr & rsparkling packages”

The tidyverse is a set of packages that work in harmony because they share common data representations and API design. The tidyverse package is designed to make it easy to install and load core packages from the tidyverse in a single command.

The best place to learn about all the packages in the tidyverse and how they fit together is R for Data Science. Expect to hear more about the tidyverse in the coming months as I work on improved package websites, making citation easier, and providing a common home for discussions about data analysis with the tidyverse.


You can install tidyverse with


This will install the core tidyverse packages that you are likely to use in almost every analysis:

  • ggplot2, for data visualisation.
  • dplyr, for data manipulation.
  • tidyr, for data tidying.
  • readr, for data import.
  • purrr, for functional programming.
  • tibble, for tibbles, a modern re-imagining of data frames.

It also installs a selection of other tidyverse packages that you’re likely to use frequently, but probably not in every analysis. This includes packages for data manipulation:

Data import:

  • DBI, for databases.
  • haven, for SPSS, SAS and Stata files.
  • httr, for web apis.
  • jsonlite for JSON.
  • readxl, for .xls and .xlsx files.
  • rvest, for web scraping.
  • xml2, for XML.

And modelling:

  • modelr, for simple modelling within a pipeline
  • broom, for turning models into tidy data

These packages will be installed along with tidyverse, but you’ll load them explicitly with library().


library(tidyverse) will load the core tidyverse packages: ggplot2, tibble, tidyr, readr, purrr, and dplyr. You also get a condensed summary of conflicts with other packages you have loaded:

#> Loading tidyverse: ggplot2
#> Loading tidyverse: tibble
#> Loading tidyverse: tidyr
#> Loading tidyverse: readr
#> Loading tidyverse: purrr
#> Loading tidyverse: dplyr
#> Conflicts with tidy packages ---------------------------------------
#> filter(): dplyr, stats
#> lag():    dplyr, stats

You can see conflicts created later with tidyverse_conflicts():

#> Attaching package: 'MASS'
#> The following object is masked from 'package:dplyr':
#>     select
#> Conflicts with tidy packages --------------------------------------
#> filter(): dplyr, stats
#> lag():    dplyr, stats
#> select(): dplyr, MASS

And you can check that all tidyverse packages are up-to-date with tidyverse_update():

#> The following packages are out of date:
#>  * broom (0.4.0 -> 0.4.1)
#>  * DBI   (0.4.1 -> 0.5)
#>  * Rcpp  (0.12.6 -> 0.12.7)
#> Update now?
#> 1: Yes
#> 2: No

This release includes a range of bug fixes and minor improvements. Some highlights from this release include:

  • period() and duration() constructors now accept character strings and allow a very flexible specification of timespans:
    period("3H 2M 1S")
    #> [1] "3H 2M 1S"
    duration("3 hours, 2 mins, 1 secs")
    #> [1] "10921s (~3.03 hours)"
    # Missing numerals default to 1. 
    # Repeated units are summed
    period("hour minute minute")
    #> [1] "1H 2M 0S"

    Period and duration parsing allows for arbitrary abbreviations of time units as long as the specification is unambiguous. For single letter specs, strptime() rules are followed, so m stands for months and M for minutes.

    These same rules allows you to compare strings and durations/periods:

    "2mins 1 sec" > period("2mins")
    #> [1] TRUE
  • Date time rounding (with round_date()floor_date() and ceiling_date()) now supports unit multipliers, like “3 days” or “2 months”:
    ceiling_date(ymd_hms("2016-09-12 17:10:00"), unit = "5 minutes")
    #> [1] "2016-09-12 17:10:00 UTC"
  • The behavior of ceiling_date for Date objects is now more intuitive. In short, dates are now interpreted as time intervals that are physically part of longer unit intervals:
    |day1| ... |day31|day1| ... |day28| ...
    |    January     |   February     | ...

    That means that rounding up 2000-01-01 by a month is done to the boundary between January and February which, i.e. 2000-02-01:

    ceiling_date(ymd("2000-01-01"), unit = "month")
    #> [1] "2000-02-01"

    This behavior is controlled by the change_on_boundary argument.

  • It is now possible to compare POSIXct and Date objects:
    ymd_hms("2000-01-01 00:00:01") > ymd("2000-01-01")
    #> [1] TRUE
  • C-level parsing now handles English months and AM/PM indicator regardless of your locale. This means that English date-times are now always handled by lubridate C-level parsing and you don’t need to explicitly switch the locale.
  • New parsing function yq() allows you to parse a year + quarter:
    #> [1] "2016-04-01"

    The new q format is available in all lubridate parsing functions.

See the release notes for the full list of changes. A big thanks goes to everyone who contributed: @arneschillert, @cderv, @ijlyttle, @jasonelaw, @jonboiser, and @krlmlr.

If you use packages from the tidyverse (like tibble and readr) you don’t need to worry about getting factors when you don’t want them. But factors are a useful data structure in their own right, particularly for modelling and visualisation, because they allow you to control the order of the levels. Working with factors in base R can be a little frustrating because of a handful of missing tools. The goal of forcats is to fill in those missing pieces so you can access the power of factors with a minimum of pain.

Install forcats with:


forcats provides two main types of tools to change either the values or the order of the levels. I’ll call out some of the most important functions below, using using the included gss_cat dataset which contains a selection of categorical variables from the General Social Survey.


#> # A tibble: 21,483 × 9
#>    year       marital   age   race        rincome            partyid
#>   <int>        <fctr> <int> <fctr>         <fctr>             <fctr>
#> 1  2000 Never married    26  White  $8000 to 9999       Ind,near rep
#> 2  2000      Divorced    48  White  $8000 to 9999 Not str republican
#> 3  2000       Widowed    67  White Not applicable        Independent
#> 4  2000 Never married    39  White Not applicable       Ind,near rep
#> 5  2000      Divorced    25  White Not applicable   Not str democrat
#> 6  2000       Married    25  White $20000 - 24999    Strong democrat
#> # ... with 2.148e+04 more rows, and 3 more variables: relig <fctr>,
#> #   denom <fctr>, tvhours <int>

Change level values

You can recode specified factor levels with fct_recode():

gss_cat %>% count(partyid)
#> # A tibble: 10 × 2
#>              partyid     n
#>               <fctr> <int>
#> 1          No answer   154
#> 2         Don't know     1
#> 3        Other party   393
#> 4  Strong republican  2314
#> 5 Not str republican  3032
#> 6       Ind,near rep  1791
#> # ... with 4 more rows

gss_cat %>%
  mutate(partyid = fct_recode(partyid,
    "Republican, strong"    = "Strong republican",
    "Republican, weak"      = "Not str republican",
    "Independent, near rep" = "Ind,near rep",
    "Independent, near dem" = "Ind,near dem",
    "Democrat, weak"        = "Not str democrat",
    "Democrat, strong"      = "Strong democrat"
  )) %>%
#> # A tibble: 10 × 2
#>                 partyid     n
#>                  <fctr> <int>
#> 1             No answer   154
#> 2            Don't know     1
#> 3           Other party   393
#> 4    Republican, strong  2314
#> 5      Republican, weak  3032
#> 6 Independent, near rep  1791
#> # ... with 4 more rows

Note that unmentioned levels are left as is, and the order of the levels is preserved.

fct_lump() allows you to lump the rarest (or most common) levels in to a new “other” level. The default behaviour is to collapse the smallest levels in to other, ensuring that it’s still the smallest level. For the religion variable that tells us that Protestants out number all other religions, which is interesting, but we probably want more level.

gss_cat %>% 
  mutate(relig = fct_lump(relig)) %>% 
#> # A tibble: 2 × 2
#>        relig     n
#>       <fctr> <int>
#> 1      Other 10637
#> 2 Protestant 10846

Alternatively you can supply a number of levels to keep, n, or minimum proportion for inclusion, prop. If you use negative values, fct_lump()will change direction, and combine the most common values while preserving the rarest.

gss_cat %>% 
  mutate(relig = fct_lump(relig, n = 5)) %>% 
#> # A tibble: 6 × 2
#>        relig     n
#>       <fctr> <int>
#> 1      Other   913
#> 2  Christian   689
#> 3       None  3523
#> 4     Jewish   388
#> 5   Catholic  5124
#> 6 Protestant 10846

gss_cat %>% 
  mutate(relig = fct_lump(relig, prop = -0.10)) %>% 
#> # A tibble: 12 × 2
#>                     relig     n
#>                    <fctr> <int>
#> 1               No answer    93
#> 2              Don't know    15
#> 3 Inter-nondenominational   109
#> 4         Native american    23
#> 5               Christian   689
#> 6      Orthodox-christian    95
#> # ... with 6 more rows

Change level order

There are four simple helpers for common operations:

  • fct_relevel() is similar to stats::relevel() but allows you to move any number of levels to the front.
  • fct_inorder() orders according to the first appearance of each level.
  • fct_infreq() orders from most common to rarest.
  • fct_rev() reverses the order of levels.

fct_reorder() and fct_reorder2() are useful for visualisations. fct_reorder() reorders the factor levels by another variable. This is useful when you map a categorical variable to position, as shown in the following example which shows the average number of hours spent watching television across religions.

relig <- gss_cat %>%
  group_by(relig) %>%
    age = mean(age, na.rm = TRUE),
    tvhours = mean(tvhours, na.rm = TRUE),
    n = n()

ggplot(relig, aes(tvhours, relig)) + geom_point()
reorder-1ggplot(relig, aes(tvhours, fct_reorder(relig, tvhours))) +


fct_reorder2() extends the same idea to plots where a factor is mapped to another aesthetic, like colour. The defaults are designed to make legends easier to read for line plots, as shown in the following example looking at marital status by age.

by_age <- gss_cat %>%
  filter(! %>%
  group_by(age, marital) %>%
  count() %>%
  mutate(prop = n / sum(n))

ggplot(by_age, aes(age, prop)) +
  geom_line(aes(colour = marital))
reorder2-1ggplot(by_age, aes(age, prop)) +
  geom_line(aes(colour = fct_reorder2(marital, age, prop))) +
  labs(colour = "marital")

Learning more

You can learn more about forcats in R for data science, and on the forcats website.

Please let me know if you have more factor problems that forcats doesn’t help with!

We’re proud to announce version 1.2.0 of the tibble package. Tibbles are a modern reimagining of the data frame, keeping what time has shown to be effective, and throwing out what is not. Grab the latest version with:


This is mostly a maintenance release, with the following major changes:

  • More options for adding individual rows and (new!) columns
  • Improved function names
  • Minor tweaks to the output

There are many other small improvements and bug fixes: please see the release notes for a complete list.

Thanks to Jenny Bryan for add_row() and add_column() improvements and ideas, to William Dunlap for pointing out a bug with tibble’s implementation of all.equal(), to Kevin Wright for pointing out a rare bug with glimpse(), and to all the other contributors. Use the issue tracker to submit bugs or suggest ideas, your contributions are always welcome.

Adding rows and columns

There are now more options for adding individual rows, and columns can be added in a similar way, illustrated with this small tibble:

df <- tibble(x = 1:3, y = 3:1)
#> # A tibble: 3 × 2
#>       x     y
#>   <int> <int>
#> 1     1     3
#> 2     2     2
#> 3     3     1

The add_row() function allows control over where the new rows are added. In the following example, the row (4, 0) is added before the second row:

df %>% 
  add_row(x = 4, y = 0, .before = 2)
#> # A tibble: 4 × 2
#>       x     y
#>   <dbl> <dbl>
#> 1     1     3
#> 2     4     0
#> 3     2     2
#> 4     3     1

Adding more than one row is now fully supported, although not recommended in general because it can be a bit hard to read.

df %>% 
  add_row(x = 4:5, y = 0:-1)
#> # A tibble: 5 × 2
#>       x     y
#>   <int> <int>
#> 1     1     3
#> 2     2     2
#> 3     3     1
#> 4     4     0
#> 5     5    -1

Columns can now be added in much the same way with the new add_column() function:

df %>% 
  add_column(z = -1:1, w = 0)
#> # A tibble: 3 × 4
#>       x     y     z     w
#>   <int> <int> <int> <dbl>
#> 1     1     3    -1     0
#> 2     2     2     0     0
#> 3     3     1     1     0

It also supports .before and .after arguments:

df %>% 
  add_column(z = -1:1, .after = 1)
#> # A tibble: 3 × 3
#>       x     z     y
#>   <int> <int> <int>
#> 1     1    -1     3
#> 2     2     0     2
#> 3     3     1     1

df %>%  
  add_column(w = 0:2, .before = "x")
#> # A tibble: 3 × 3
#>       w     x     y
#>   <int> <int> <int>
#> 1     0     1     3
#> 2     1     2     2
#> 3     2     3     1

The add_column() function will never alter your existing data: you can’t overwrite existing columns, and you can’t add new observations.

Function names

frame_data() is now tribble(), which stands for “transposed tibble”. The old name still works, but will be deprecated eventually.

  ~x, ~y,
   1, "a",
   2, "z"
#> # A tibble: 2 × 2
#>       x     y
#>   <dbl> <chr>
#> 1     1     a
#> 2     2     z

Output tweaks

We’ve tweaked the output again to use the multiply character × instead of x when printing dimensions (this still renders nicely on Windows.) We surround non-semantic column with backticks, and dttm is now used instead of time to distinguish POSIXt and hms (or difftime) values.

The example below shows the new rendering:

tibble(`date and time` = Sys.time(), time = hms::hms(minutes = 3))
#> # A tibble: 1 × 2
#>       `date and time`     time
#>                <dttm>   <time>
#> 1 2016-08-29 16:48:57 00:03:00

Expect the printed output to continue to evolve in next release. Stay tuned for a new function that reconstructs tribble() calls from existing data frames.

I’m pleased to announce version 1.1.0 of stringr. stringr makes string manipulation easier by using consistent function and argument names, and eliminating options that you don’t need 95% of the time. To get started with stringr, check out the strings chapter in R for data science. Install it with:


This release is mostly bug fixes, but there are a couple of new features you might care out.

  • There are three new datasets, fruitwords and sentences, to help you practice your regular expression skills:
    str_subset(fruit, "(..)\\1")
    #> [1] "banana"      "coconut"     "cucumber"    "jujube"      "papaya"     
    #> [6] "salal berry"
    #> [1] "a"        "able"     "about"    "absolute" "accept"   "account"
    #> [1] "The birch canoe slid on the smooth planks."
  • More functions work with boundary()str_detect() and str_subset() can detect boundaries, and str_extract() and str_extract_all() pull out the components between boundaries. This is particularly useful if you want to extract logical constructs like words or sentences.
    x <- "This is harder than you might expect, e.g. punctuation!"
    x %>% str_extract_all(boundary("word")) %>% .[[1]]
    #> [1] "This"        "is"          "harder"      "than"        "you"        
    #> [6] "might"       "expect"      "e.g"         "punctuation"
    x %>% str_extract(boundary("sentence"))
    #> [1] "This is harder than you might expect, e.g. punctuation!"
  • str_view() and str_view_all() create HTML widgets that display regular expression matches. This is particularly useful for teaching.

For a complete list of changes, please see the release notes.

Want to Master R?  There’s no better time or place if you’re within an easy train, plane, automobile ride or a short jog of Hadley Wickham’s workshop on September 12th and 13th at the AMA Conference Center in New York City.

Register here:

As of today, there are just 20+ seats left. Discounts are still available for academics (students or faculty) and for 5 or more attendees from any organization. Email if you have any questions about the workshop that you don’t find answered on the registration page.

Hadley has no Master R workshops planned for Boston, Washington DC, New York City or any location in the Northeast in the next year. If you’ve always wanted to take Master R but haven’t found the time, well, there’s truly no better time!

P.S. We’ve arranged a “happy hour” reception after class on Monday the 12th. Be sure to set aside an hour or so after the first day to talk to your classmates and Hadley about what’s happening in R.